Athletic Shoes-How to select the right ones.

Foot, Ankle, Heel

How to Select the Right Athletic Shoes

FootcareMD.com-This material was codeveloped with the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

Proper-fitting sports shoes can enhance performance and prevent injuries. Follow these fitting facts when purchasing a new pair of athletic shoes.

  • If possible, purchase athletic shoes from a specialty store. The staff will provide valuable input on the type of shoe needed for your sport as well as help with proper fitting. This may cost a premium in price but is worthwhile, particularly for shoes that are used often.
  • Try on athletic shoes after a workout or run and at the end of the day. Your feet will be at their largest.
  • Wear the same type of sock that you will wear for that sport.
  • When the shoe is on your foot, you should be able to freely wiggle all of your toes.
  • The shoes should be comfortable as soon as you try them on. There is no break-in period.
  • Walk or run a few steps in your shoes. They should be comfortable.
  • Always re-lace the shoes you are trying on. You should begin at the farthest eyelets and apply even pressure as you create a crisscross lacing pattern to the top of the shoe.
  • There should be a firm grip of the shoe to your heel. Your heel should not slip as you walk or run.
  • If you participate in a sport three or more times a week, you need a sport-specific shoe.
  • It can be hard to choose from the many different types of athletic shoes available. There are differences in design and variations in material and weight. These differences have been developed to protect the areas of the feet that encounter the most stress in a particular athletic activity.

Athletic shoes are grouped into categories: Running, training and walking. This includes shoes for hiking, jogging and exercise walking. For a walking shoe, look for a comfortable soft upper, good shock absorption, smooth tread, and a rocker sole design that encourages the natural roll of the foot during the walking motion. The features of a good jogging shoe include cushioning, flexibility, control and stability in the heel counter area, as well as lightness and good traction.

Court sports. Includes shoes for tennis, basketball and volleyball. Most court sports require the body to move forward, backward and side-to-side. As a result, most athletic shoes used for court sports are subjected to heavy abuse. The key to finding a good court shoe is its sole.

Field sports.
 Includes shoes for soccer football, and baseball. These shoes are cleated, studded or spiked. The spike and stud formations vary from sport to sport, but generally there are replaceable or detachable cleats, spikes or studs affixed onto nylon soles.

Track and field sport shoes. Because of the specific needs of individual runners, athletic shoe companies produce many models for various foot types, gait patterns and training styles.

Specialty sports. Includes shoes for golf, aerobic dancing and bicycling.

Outdoor sports. Includes shoes used for recreational activities such as hunting, fishing and boating.

Learn more about about sport shoes:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fall Proof Your Home

November 17, 2017

‘Tis the season to fall-proof your home

Orthopaedic surgeons offer fall prevention safety tips

AAOS-ROSEMONT, Ill. (Nov. 17, 2017)—The holidays are about spending time with family and friends. And while many people focus on fulfilling holiday traditions like decorating their homes, shopping for presents, and hosting parties, they often forget to fall-proof their homes.

Falls are dangerous and can cause serious fractures that could impact one’s ability to move and carry-out daily functions. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 300,000 adults age 65 years and older, are hospitalized for hip fractures each year, and more than 95 percent of hip fractures are caused by falling.

“While older people are at an increased risk for falls due to the normal effects of aging such as decreased quality of vision, balance and strength, a popular misconception is that they’re the only ones at risk,” said orthopaedic trauma surgeon and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeon spokesperson Lisa Cannada, MD. “The reality is people of all ages are at risk for falls due to environmental and health factors. The first step to reducing your risk is making necessary changes in your home.”

Fall-proofing is not only beneficial for new house guests who are visiting this season. It’s also helpful to people who are familiar with their home surroundings. The AAOS and the Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA), whose members treat patients who sustain fractures and injuries from a fall, encourage everyone to consider the following tips to enjoy a fall-free holiday:

  • Reduce clutter. It’s easy to accumulate clutter, such as boxes of decor and stacks of gifts from holiday shopping. Take the time to declutter your home, especially the hallways and stairs.
  • Designate a play area. Children may receive lots of new toys for the holidays and scatter them around the house. It’s important to contain those toys in a dedicated play area and clean up the toys after kids are done playing to avoid tripping.
  • Keep walkways clear. Keep the path between your front door, driveway and mailbox well-lit and clear of debris.
  • Install nightlights. Keep the halls/walkways in your home well-lit and consider a nightlight in your bathroom. A clear path is especially helpful for family members or guests who are trying to get to the restroom in the middle of the night.
  • Secure all loose area rugs. Place double-sided carpet tape or slip-resistant backing on all loose rugs around your home including the bathroom.
  • Rearrange furniture. Ensure no furniture is blocking pathways between rooms.
  • Consider stair gates. If you have young kids who will be visiting for the holidays, or who live in your home, consider installing child-proof gates at the top and bottom of your stairs to prevent children from accessing them without adult supervision.
  • If a fall happens, do not panic. Take several deep breaths, assess the situation and determine if you are hurt. If you are badly injured do not try to get up, instead, call for help from a family member or a neighbor. If you are alone when a fall happens, slowly crawl to the telephone and call 911 or relatives.

For more fall-proofing safety tips visit the AAOS and OTA Falls Awareness and Prevention Guide.